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Primitive Fixins with Cinnamon Crafting Dough


With their deep rich dark red and brown colors, primitive fixins look and smell great especially during the Fall and holiday seasons. They look wonderful when placed in bowls, jars, and around scented candles and really give off a rustic country feel. They consist basically of scented dried rosehips and cinnamon sticks, you can add other fragrant whole spices like anise stars, nutmeg, and allspice to add more color and fragrance to the blend. Another interesting thing is the addition of mini cinnamon rolls – these are just for decoration and not meant to be eaten. These mini cinnamon rolls can be made out of scented wax which you can either make from scratch or buy from some candle supply stores. They can also be made from scented crafting dough, which is a fun project so I would like to share.

In the above photo I had made them with cinnamon crafting dough which is very very fragrant and as you can see comes out in a deep brown color which I really like for a Fall look.  This crafting dough is the same one I used for the mini gingerbread men which you can find here.

Following that recipe, once you remove the dough from the refrigerator and it is pliable enough for you to work with, cut little strips and roll them between your fingers and shape them into mini rolls and set them on wax paper to dry. As I said in the other post, I prefer the air drying method and make sure you turn them over regularly to prevent any curling. Once they are thoroughly dry and hard, you can dab them with white crafting paint for icing or you can even drizzle them with scented candle wax.

These mini cinnamon rolls look and smell terrific, especially when they are displayed with fragrant fixins and candles and other Fall decorations.

*Be sure to use caution if you display them out of the reach of small children, they may think that they’re edible and try to eat them.

Holiday Gingerbread Fixins


This cute and fragrant fixins blend is perfect for Christmas. It has a fragrant combination of cinnamon and citrus smells. This blend is easy and fun to make with dried rosehips, dried citrus peels, dried orange slices, dried whole slit oranges, and cinnamon sticks. I also added cedar leaf tips for some green color. You can also add whole spices like cloves and anise stars to add to the lovely fragrance.

The cutest things about this blend are the little cinnamon gingerbread ornies. For these great smelling little ornies, you will need to make the cinnamon crafting dough, it’s really easy to make, all you need is:

1 cup ground cinnamon

4 tablespoons white Elmer’s glue

3/4 to 1 cup warm water


As you can see, these aren’t the kinds of ornaments you’re going to be able to eat after they’re done. The glue makes this dough get nice and hard when it dries, so your ornies are going to be pretty much indestructable, and they’re going to smell fantastically cinnamony. You can also hang them on a Christmas tree (or anywhere else) too, but if you plan to do this make sure you poke holes in them for string or ribbon when they’re still soft and pliable because as I already mentioned, this dough gets really hard when it dries out. And believe me, I speak from the experience of having a real DUH moment because when I first made them for my fixins, after they were dry it dawned on me that they would make great hanging ornament too…yeah I’m a swift one ain’t I? So needless to say I ended up making a new batch, but it’s fun so I really didn’t mind.

To make the dough, take a large bowl and mix the cinnamon and Elmer’s glue first and then gradually begin adding the water until your dough reaches the consistency of play dough. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let it set in the refrigerator for about 1/2 hour, this helps to make the dough more pliable. When your dough is ready, cut and roll pieces of it out with a rolling pin, just like you’re making cookies, to about 1/8 inch thickness and make cut outs with your cookie cutters. And if you plan to hang them, cut holes in the part where you want to pass your string or ribbon through.

Now for the drying out part, I recommend air drying them because first of all, they dry more evenly and thoroughly this way and second of all, there is less chance of the edges curling upwards. I’ve tried both air and oven drying and they come out much better when you air dry them even though it takes longer, it will take a couple of days and make sure that you turn them over frequently because this helps to keep the edges from curling.

After they are dry, you can leave them as is which would give your fixins a nice rustic primitive look, or you can add some color with acrylic craft paint. You can paint buttons, bow ties, eyes, and mouths. You can also use glitter, or glue little bowties that you cut out of paper or fabric, wherever your creativity takes you.

I also want to add that there are many different crafting dough recipes out there, some of them use applesauce along with the cinnamon. I just posted the recipe that I personally like because I find it pliable and easy to work with. If you decide to try it out, I hope you have fun!

Primitive Salt Dough Ornies


Salt dough ornies are a great addition to your country primitive home decor. They are very easy and fun to make, you can make holes in them and hang them or you can add them to rose hips for a prim fixins blend. They are made the same way that you make dough cookies but these ornies ARE DEFINITELY NOT EDIBLE. Not only would they taste terrible but they become hard as a rock, they are purely for decoration purposes.

To make them, you will need cookie cutters (for my ornies in the pic I used a round cookie cutter and a bird cookie cutter), acrylic paints ( I used orange and black) and paint brushes and your dough. For the dough you will need:

2 cups flour

1 cup salt

1 cup water


In a bowl, combine the flour and salt and slowly begin adding your cup of water until your dough becomes smooth and pliable, you might not even need to use the whole cup of water to get the dough to your desired consistency so you can knead it and work with it.

When your dough is at a workable consistency, working on a lightly floured surface, knead it and roll it out flat with a rolling pin and cut shapes with the cookie cutters. For mine I used to round cutters for the prim Annie faces and the bird cutters for the crows. If you want to hang them, poke holes in them with a straw. After you’re done cutting your shapes, place them on baking paper on a cookie sheet and bake them. The temperature and timing depend on how thick your ornies are. Slow bake them with the oven temp set at about 200 degrees until they become hard and dry.

Remove them from the oven and let them cool. Once they are cool, you can begin decorating them with your paint. I used the orange and black paint to draw and color the Annie faces and hair and the black paint to color the prim crows. I didn’t poke holes in mine because I didn’t want to hang them, I used them as a display with scented rose hips, cinnamon sticks, and whole nutmeg for a fragrant primitive fixins blend.

Of course you can used whatever cookie cutters you want for your shapes and whatever paint colors you want and you can even use glitter and other embellishments to decorate them. If you poke holes in them, you can hang them with ribbon, or jute, or string, or raffia.

And please remember to use caution if you are making them around children who might think that the ornies are actually cookies and might try to bite into them and eat them.